Jessa Seewald, formerly known as Jessa Duggar, is no stranger to raising kids.

Not only was she one of the oldest of 19, but she also has three children of her own.

One of her children, 3-year-old Spurgeon Seewald, is getting to the age where he wants to help his mom with certain chores, such as vacuuming, cooking, and more.

Jessa took to Instagram to share a video of Spurgeon using their vacuum and encouraged other parents to support their child’s desire to help.

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There’s a window of time in the toddler years where little ones become eager to help. It’s so sweet to watch their excitement as they are allowed to take part in meaningful tasks— not pretend “helping”, but really doing something that helps out the whole family. Playing together is fun, but even the cleanup can be fun if we do it together. 👦🏻💙 There’s a sense of importance and belonging and being needed. Sometimes as a mom I have to pause and remember this. Yes, it may take 5x longer than if I did it myself, but they find it exciting to help out and lend a hand. We definitely need to encourage this and not squelch the excitement. Spurgeon wanted to vacuum the rug this morning, so I showed him how to get started, and then he took over. I stood there in awe watching this determined little guy. After 10 min of going in circles and stopping to inspect for any missed spots, he had the whole thing spotless! Wiping down the table, putting away toys, dumping ingredients and mixing in a bowl, grabbing a diaper for the baby, loading spoons and cups into the dishwasher— they’re eager to take part. As they show interest in household tasks, there needs to be less of sending them off to play, and more of bringing them alongside us and involving them in what we’re doing. At first, tasks will be joint or may require our full supervision, but before we know it they will be older, competent, and be able do these tasks on their own— and do them well. My mom modeled this beautifully. “There’s a window of time where they’re eager to help. Capture it. Don’t squelch it.” ☺️❤️

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The 26-year-old wrote:

There’s a window of time in the toddler years where little ones become eager to help. It’s so sweet to watch their excitement as they are allowed to take part in meaningful tasks— not pretend “helping”, but really doing something that helps out the whole family. Playing together is fun, but even the cleanup can be fun if we do it together. There’s a sense of importance and belonging and being needed.

Jessa continued by saying that even she needs to remind herself of that and allow her children to feel that “sense of importance”:

Sometimes as a mom I have to pause and remember this. Yes, it may take 5x longer than if I did it myself, but they find it exciting to help out and lend a hand. We definitely need to encourage this and not squelch the excitement. Spurgeon wanted to vacuum the rug this morning, so I showed him how to get started, and then he took over. I stood there in awe watching this determined little guy. After 10 min of going in circles and stopping to inspect for any missed spots, he had the whole thing spotless!

The mom added that parents should support their kids’ want to help, rather than sending them away to play because it’s just easier that way:

Wiping down the table, putting away toys, dumping ingredients and mixing in a bowl, grabbing a diaper for the baby, loading spoons and cups into the dishwasher— they’re eager to take part. As they show interest in household tasks, there needs to be less of sending them off to play, and more of bringing them alongside us and involving them in what we’re doing. At first, tasks will be joint or may require our full supervision, but before we know it they will be older, competent, and be able do these tasks on their own— and do them well. My mom modeled this beautifully. “There’s a window of time where they’re eager to help. Capture it. Don’t squelch it.”

Thousands of moms nodded along in agreement.

Many agreed that, while it is easier to just do it yourself, letting the kids help you is also helping them create good habits for later in life.

However, others joked that parents should let their kids help when they are young because “when they are teenagers….no more helping!”

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Jessa Seewald Says It’s Important for Parents to Let Kids Help Around the House When They Show Interest

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