Actor and entrepreneur Gwyneth Paltrow founded her lifestyle and beauty brand, Goop, back in 2008.

Goop has since flourished into a successful business, featuring high-priced face creams and essential oils. But the brand has faced its fair share of controversies.

Layne Murdoch Jr./Stringer/Getty Images

Earlier this year, Paltrow was slammed for the selling “yoni eggs” — stone eggs that are meant to be placed in the vagina for “chi, orgasms, vaginal muscle tone, hormonal balance, and feminine energy in general.”

According to earlier reports, Goop claimed that the $55 to $66 eggs could help “empower” women and were once used by “emperors.” But one doctor decided to call out the company.

Dr. Jen Gunter, OBGYN, wrote a blog post slamming the “powerful” eggs. She wrote:

I have been asked by so many people about your vaginal rocks that I felt it necessary to drop you a line. I read the post on GOOP and all I can tell you is it is the biggest load of garbage I have read on your site since vaginal steaming. It’s even worse than claiming bras cause cancer.

Screenshot/Goop

And now, Goop has landed in hot water once again.

Truth in Advertising (TINA) announced this week that they were taking action against Paltrow and Goop for their “deceptive” advertising, according to a press release from the organization.

TINA said that their investigation revealed that Goop makes unsubstantiated claims about the medical effects of their products without any scientific backing. TINA said in the press release:

But a TINA.org investigation into Goop’s marketing has revealed more than 50 instances in which the company claims, either expressly or implicitly, that its products (or those it promotes) can treat, cure, prevent, alleviate the symptoms of, or reduce the risk of developing a number of ailments.  […]

The problem is that the company does not possess the competent and reliable scientific evidence required by law to make such claims.

According to Buzzfeed, TINA notified Goop on Aug. 11 that they needed to adjust their language by Aug. 18 — but Paltrow’s brand didn’t budge.

TINA said in the press release that they have now notified regulators:

As a result, TINA.org on Tuesday filed a complaint with two California district attorneys, urging the regulators to investigate Goop’s marketing and take appropriate enforcement action.

However, Goop doesn’t seem to feel threatened by the organization. They issued a statement of their own slamming TINA, according to Yahoo Celebrity.

Goop is dedicated to introducing unique products and offerings and encouraging constructive conversation surrounding new ideas. We are receptive to feedback and consistently seek to improve the quality of the products and information referenced on our site.

We responded promptly and in good faith to the initial outreach from representatives of TINA and hoped to engage with them to address their concerns. Unfortunately, they provided limited information and made threats under arbitrary deadlines which were not reasonable under the circumstances.

They also called TINA’s claims “unsubstantiated and unfounded.”

It doesn’t look like Goop is ready to yank their famous “yoni eggs” or their health claims down any time soon.

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Gwyneth Paltrow’s Health Brand Makes Big Promises — Some Say It’s a Load of ‘Goop’

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